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Telling a customer No

JamesStorageJamesStorage MORegistered User ✭✭✭
What's the best way you have to tell a person we will not rent to them? I have always found it difficult to explain to a customer that we don't want their business (Or more specifically the trouble they bring)

Comments

  • OrkoceanOrkocean CARegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭
    We are actually fixing to encounter this exact issue at one of our properties. We're doing cheapest prices in town to fill the box but the area is very lower end with lots of homeless. We were all spitballing ideas to weed them out. One initial idea was if they didn't have a vehicle and license plate info to provide we don't rent to them to try and weed out the homeless but my argument to that was depending on your area you CAN have good customers who ride the bus, bikes or even walk. As far as having no actual denial reason other than you just don't want them cause you know it'll be issues... I don't know the best way to get that across without literally telling them that. 
  • CVSSSTORAGECVSSSTORAGE CARegistered User, Daily Operations Certified ✭✭✭
    I just tell them we are full lol
  • i43storagei43storage WIRegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭
    When a customer comes in and appears too problematic for a variety of reasons, we have said, "I don't think this is the place for you, perhaps you should look elsewhere.  It doesn't look like our product matches your needs, etc."
    Jean Marie
    I-43 Storage
  • campcamp CARegistered User
    We require a credit card to start the lease. That weeds out quite a few people.
  • KeriKeri MIRegistered User
    WOW just reading some of the comments makes me fell like none of you want business !! And how do you purpose to weed out problematic clients and what makes a client problematic the way they look dress have tattoos a different color skin??? Do you ask if they our homeless ?? If you are clear that the access hours are a certain time and that you are monitoring those hours it would be quite easy to see who is staying overnight at the facility. 
  • OrkoceanOrkocean CARegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭
    Not all business is good business. There is no stereotypical good or bad customer honestly. The well off customers can be your biggest headache sometimes. I don't know about everyone else but if you've done this for awhile you can usually get a "vibe" about someone that doesn't feel right, those just get watched extra close. Even the best can miss things, some customers are pretty clever in how to hide their tracks. There was a video years ago on youtube where a guy showed off living in a unit at a public storage I believe. He had that place rigged up, even had a magnet set to the inside of his door to slide his latch over and make it look legit. 
  • i43storagei43storage WIRegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Keri  Problematic customers come in all shapes and sizes.  Like @Orkocean said, sometimes the wealthiest customers cause the most headache.
    Jean Marie
    I-43 Storage
  • KeriKeri MIRegistered User
    All business is good business until you don't want to serve in your Business !! I have been running the same facility for over 14 years you should never pre judge any person walking in the door or assume that they will be problematic is all I am saying.  
  • Matt_WMatt_W NARegistered User
    We require that all tenants provide a picture ID and be able to give us a physical mailing address. This does a little bit to stop the homeless. If we suspect that someone is going to try and live in a storage unit, I'll do extra walk throughs at random times. If they go in for long periods of time it requires addressing.
    Just having a copy of a photo ID and a physical mailing address (or making providing those two things a requirement) might help
  • AnitaJohnson1269AnitaJohnson1269 NCRegistered User ✭✭✭
    I had a tenant that was homeless, staying at a local shelter.  Never a problem, paid on time.  Would stop by every so often and bring an item they had gotten from a donation or had found a good deal on.  This was everything they owned! After about 5 months, they got back on their feet, rented a home, and had furnishings to put in it.  People become homeless for various reasons, in this situation it was a domestic situation. I'm with @Keri on this one.  We don't always know the whole story. Now, if they are known to be a problem (this is where communication with other facilities is good) that's another story.  I try to remember, "There but by the Grace of God, go I" 
  • sonyawiprudsonyawiprud CARegistered User ✭✭✭
    We do not discriminate, however we do make the property rules very clear to them, if after a few weeks they prove to be problematic we just terminate our agreement,  pointing to the infraction committed. Yes it is tough but they know what they've done wrong and usually go quietly. 
  • teamcapitolateamcapitola CARegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭

    I think it's naïve to say "all business is good business"  ....especially if your facility is running close to capacity.

    "bad business" is the customer who compromises the safety/security of your facility, argues or yells at other tenants, tries to sleep in the unit, uses drugs or alcohol on the property, goes into Lien over and over.... I can go on but I'm sure you all get the point.

    I've only turned away business a few times over the years, but when I did it was for multiple obvious flags, not just what they looked like.

    My favorite "well, you have so many rules...I'm just NOT going to follow them.. what are you going to do about it?!"

    Or the guy who goes and shoots up in the restroom for 30 minutes... before the tour...yes it HAS happened.

    Less obvious include the client is asking too many questions about camera locations and security measures... when are staff onsite... etc.

    A local facility rented a unit to someone without ID and in a rush...pushy..(its at home, ill bring it tomorrow) and they ended up with an unpaid 10x10 full of bald tires...that had to go to auction!

    I'm just saying there are  going to be times when you have to make a call between "the money" or a secure/safe facility.


  • OrkoceanOrkocean CARegistered User, Daily Operations Certified, Advanced Operations Certified, Administrator Certified, myHub Certified ✭✭✭✭✭
    Exactly @teamcapitola... If they are defensive over wanting to provide basic information or question rules then that's a pretty big red flag. In 8 years i've had maybe 3 occurances I can think of where i've literally stopped the process, pulled the info sheet back and put it into the shredder and told them they should look elsewhere for storage as it seems our policies will not suit them. 
  • SanSabaSongbirdSanSabaSongbird NCRegistered User
    If a customer starts arguing about the terms of the lease or has no ID that is a red flag to me.  It is not discrimination.  It is called Risk Management.  It is our job to protect our property and ourselves.
  • Matt_WMatt_W NARegistered User
    You're not just thinking of your business, you are also thinking of the existing customers possessions- that is what they pay us for, after all. Keeping their goods safe. 
    You are essentially the door man.
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